Friday, 5 January 2018

A Big Pot of Soup


Most days during the colder months we have decided that lunch will be a bowl of homemade soup.

The easiest way to do this is to make a huge pot full on Monday morning and then portion it up for each day.  That way all  the washing of vegetables, peeling (if any), chopping and washing of pots afterwards is all done in one fell swoop and for the rest of the week we have a nice homemade 'ready meal' waiting for us in the fridge and minimal pots to wash afterwards.


Portioning it up at the start of the week means that we are not reheating the great big pan full each day and also are not having to find room in the fridge for it ... it's a rather large pan!!

The white re-purposed yogurt pots hold 500g of soup, enough for one large portion and the pot at the end holds 1kg, enough for both of us.

We have also decided that we are going to alternate which of us makes the soup as Alan likes his thick and chunky and I like mine rich and smooth.  This week as you can probably see from the pictures it's Alan's week.

The recipe is simple -

1 Onion
2 sticks of Celery
Vegetable Stock Cube

A selection of vegetables that look like they need using up from the fridge
A selection of vegetables from the tunnels and Veggie Patch
Salt and Pepper

Alan's selection this week was -

2 Leeks
3 Carrots
2 Beetroot
a handful of Kale
2 Turnips
2 Potatoes
half of my jar of Dried Soup Mix

And the method is as simple as can be -

Chop all the vegetables, put into a large pan with the stock cube and any other flavourings you want to use, for this I would have used turmeric, chilli flakes, garlic and tomato puree, Alan didn't.  Cover with water and bring to the boil, then leave to simmer for as long as you can.

We pop the pan into the bottom oven of the Aga for at least three hours, stirring every hour if we are around to check on it's progress.


We vary how we have it for lunch slightly each day, for instance on Monday we just had a huge bowlful each before the rest was put into the tubs for the fridge, on Tuesday we had a slightly smaller portion with a slice of toast each and then on Wednesday was this photo ... a bread roll each with spread for me and with some leftover pate for Alan. 

It's nice to have something to dunk  :-)

Sue xx

22 comments:

  1. Yum!! Huge soup fan here and I do exactly the same as you although I do it at the weekend and freeze it in portions for the week ahead. I leave one out overnight then take it to work the next day for lunch. Saves time, money, it's healthy and I rarely waste any vegetables.

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  2. That looks lovely! I live in Florida and it has been cold and windy with rain here and snow and ice elsewhere in the state, so soup has been my main meal. Will try this recipe. Thanks.

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  3. I tend to freeze my soup portions and use carryout (takeaway) type boxes.
    They pack better in the freezer and re-heat quicker!

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    1. That's a really good idea. At the moment though all my takeaway tubs are already in the freezer full of tomato based sauces. Luckily the yogurt pots are just going into the fridge for the week and there's more and more room appearing in there as we eat our way through the Christmas goodies.

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  4. Hallo,Sue, I’m back having had a good “memory” think. I’ve just read your soup post, and I notice that you put in what you have..my childhood soups were more specific...we came to England in the late forties ,from a rich mediterranean country, the Lebanon, where there seemed to be everything to a cold (and to us) dark Wales. The only work my father could get at that time was as a labourer on a dairy farm..very little money, no running water, electricity, cooking on a primus, however after the horrors of Siberia etc my parents set to..they made the best of what they had.Actually, living on a dairy farm meant that they had access to milk, cream, butter, made white cheese and yoghurt. (Later when we moved to London it was grimmer, one never to be forgotten meal..Whale meat! yeurrgh!)
    Anyway ,with dairy products, a potato field..full of thistles!..and foraged stuff, this is what I remember Mama cooking
    Wild sorrel soup,fried in butter,then boiled with potatoes,stock cube..she always had Knorr stock cubes! served with cream and hardboiled eggs quartered. Mushroom soup,stock cube, pearl barley, cream...potato soup,with cream...very occasionally chicken soup with vermicelli, then potatoes dumplings (like gnocchi) fried in butter and onions...potato and flour pastry stuffed with mashed potatoes! and fried onions in butter,..alternate stuffings cooked sauerkraut,mushrooms or cottage cheese a-bit like ravioli...potato pancakes...grated raw potato moisture squeezed out,eggs,flor and fried in butter. eggs hardboiled scooped out of their shells, salt,pepper, piled back into the halved shells an d ....fried in butter!.are you beginning to sense a pattern hereπŸ˜€...it was cream,and butter heavy, but my mother lived to be ninety three years old.amazing what can be be achieved with a good will...
    I am sooo glad you’re continuing blogging..I love it
    Btw guess what nationality I am from the food
    Teresa

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    1. What a wonderfully resourceful woman your Mama sounds, making good use of everything she could to care for her family and keep you all nutritiously fed through hard times. Your parents gave obviously left you with wonderful memories even though they were going through a tough time.

      Going off what you say, the timeline of Siberia going through hell and the foods you mention ...I would hazard a guess that you are Russian or Austrian, but you mention the Lebanon, so maybe a dual nationality.

      You HAVE to let me know 😊

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    2. Captured by Red Army in country of origin, Siberian exile and labour camp, Escape with Gen Anders to Persia. Palestine for “rest and recuperation”. (Mama was having a baby!) Lebanon, and then Great Britain.....pure Polish, but if sometimes I’m accused of being a philistine because I don’t appreciate some kinds of “art” I can cheerfully say “yes I am a philistine”πŸ˜‚
      Teresa

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    3. Drat, I didn't think of Poland at all ... I should have done. WHAT a journey!!

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  5. You can't go wrong with a thrifty soup, soup is something I never tire of.

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  6. I made a huge kettle of vegetable soup last night, and have some bread loaves rising right now. Soup and bread (or sandwiches) are perfect in the cold weather! If you like your soup less chunky, could you use a blender or potato masher to change Alan's soup more to your preference? Deb

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    1. Yesterday I did just that, nice smooth soup for lunch ... he didn't even notice at first. Today I added chillies for some extra heat. 😊

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  7. Soup is defiantly something we have during the winter months, I tend to have it for lunch with some bread & butter and then if we are wanting once during the week as an evening meal. For us it really is the best "fast food". We also tend to freeze ours in portions. One tip I did read and do often is if I am lacking in space in the freezer I tend to freeze soup in a cupcake tin, then once frozen just put them into a bag loose. I tend to take 2/3 cupcakes of soup in to fill a cup. Nessy x

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    1. That's a good idea. I use my silicone ice cube trays for smaller amounts of things but I've never thought to use my cup cake sized ones. Brilliant ... thanks 😊

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  8. Nothing, but nothing beats a good bowl of homemade soup.

    God bless.

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  9. I prefer a chunky soap too, even tomato needs to have bits in it. It's a texture thing for me. I have to put something in yogurt, fruit, nuts, something. Although I would be spicing it up. As well as a bite for texture, a bite for spice! I use mason jars to store a lot of soup, and the days I work, I can just nuke in the jar. Easy clean up.

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  10. This soup thing is great! And especially good in the winter cold, so we do what you do. We make a big portion and eat on it for days. It’s then what I call fast food! Two differences from fast food is low cost and healthier. We are moving (again) to a plant based way of eating. My DH has to be careful of salt so I must find ways to reduce it. So I don’t use pre packaged soup cubes. Instead I use beans, while soaking to soften, I chop celery onion, carrots. Then put the chopped items in a pan and soften with water, with dried Italian seasoning, garlic powder, onion flakes and minced garlic from a jar. While all veggies are cooking together I peel two small to medium sweet potatoes, chopping one small and the other chunky. Smalller chunked sweet potato gets microwaved then using potato masher mash it up. Add to veggie base and then microwave the chunky bits of second potato so it is 3/4 cooked. Once beans have soaked for an hour, rinse them, place all in pot with veggie base and additional water and cook until done, from 1 & 1/2,hours to 2. Generally with 30 minutes to go, add fresh or canned rinsed chopped mushrooms and a can of low sodium chopped tomatoes. The sweet potato adds lots of flavor, and I often add leftover green veggies at the end or frozen green veggies—just whatever is on hand. We eat with a tossed salad and/or dry toasted brown bread. This recipe works with any bean except lentils as lentils take less time to cook, but that’s the only difference. Sometimes we serve the soup over long grained brown rice or a potato.If a little more flavor is needed we add a very low sodium soy sauce. Neither of us can handle hot or even mild spicy food but we enjoy flavorful foods. Great on the budget and vegan too.
    Love your blogs, and so glad you have continued—-what an exciting year it promises to be. Thank you, Sonja

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  11. Hi Sue

    Happy New Year to you all. Very pleased that you are continuing with your blog.

    We (hubby and I) are watching our calorie intake (boring, but necessary) and I recently made myself some soup - for the freezer - and have calculated that 50g of veggie soup = 137 cals. Looking at the huge tubs you & your hubby have, I think I've miscalculated. Do you bother to calculate calories? I have made a note to use celery and an onion (something I've never thought of doing), although I'll be using the carcass of our chickens for stock.

    Keep warm

    CMW

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    1. No we don't count calories and never have. We eat sensible meals, eat until we are just comfortably full and try not to snack. Of course some of that has gone out of the window a bit over Christmas ... but we hope to get back on it with our new even simpler way of eating.

      The golden trio for soup and stew making is usually onion, celery and carrots, they add a good base flavour to every recipe.

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    2. Thanks for your reply/advice. Yes, it's all about eating sensible meals and eat until "comfortably full". That's the reason we are counting our calories. :-(

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  12. Soup is the best - especially when it's Minus 22C outside with a howling wind making it feel even colder! I'm having the last bowl of beef, been & barley soup tonight - with the last bowl of mushroom soup in the fridge designated for tomorrow's lunch. That means I'll be making a fresh pot on Sunday - since I'm determined not to go into a shop again until Tuesday it will be Potato/Onion/Carrots with red lentils and lots of cumin & coriander to give it a kick!

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    1. That's my kind of soup, Margie, except I omit the potatoes. Also suffering in Toronto from the deep freeze we are currently experiencing so soup is a must!

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  13. Love homemade soup, you just can't beat it and it's so forgiving too. You can throw pretty much anything in and it'll be tasty. My favourite is still potato, courgette and cheese, perfect for cold evenings followed by chunky tomato.

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