Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Emptying Drawers, Handcream Tip and Free Books


I took these two photos before we went to Tesco the other night.  Compared to how these drawers looked over the Christmas holidays they are positively sparse now.  Added to this one after our shopping trip was the white cabbage and the bag of mixed vegetables.


During wartime rationing though this amount and variety of fresh food would have been exciting to see. 

Especially seeing two almost full bags of onions, they were in very short supply during the war years, and only country folk and those with their own gardens or patches of land for growing in town, would have any kind of regular supply at all.  They do take up a lot of room to grow.

And I'm guessing a melon would have been unheard of!!


I brought this tube of hand cream in out of the car after trying and trying unsuccessfully to get any more out of it, as you can see once chopped in half it yielded another few days supply.


Using the chopped off top part as a lid keeps it from drying out too quickly.


A final thing ...

Did you pick up your copies of the free books offered by the Radio Times over the Christmas period, they are well worth having.  The last little tokens were in last weeks edition.  As you can see I got both of the Little Women books and I also the Paddington Bear one, but I can't find that anywhere on my shelves.  I do get annoyed when I lose things!!

Sue xx

13 comments:

  1. In wartimes they just got on with it didn't they, made use of what very little they had and stretched it as far as they could, I think we are all guilty of taking the abundance of food available for granted and most things really. I have sold several books recently so I could treat myself to some dvd's, after seeing your post on dvd's I have just bought The Complete Victorian Farm Collection 5 dvd set. So looking foward to that, I got it for a very good price from acorndvd.com it was £29.99 with free post which is good compared to else where, even second hand was more expensive than that.

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  2. Little Women a classic!

    Given our food bank and money/debt issues in this country i dont know why the government dont implement growing our own food again like they did in wartime

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  3. I too, like you, wrap my veggies well when storing them in the fridge but we are now trying to reduce plastic so leftovers are either in a bowl or on a plate with a plate on top, I take little net bags shopping to purchase loose veg and of course in war time years there was no cling film, mind you probably no spare veg to store and few fridges, any ideas on keeping cut and spare veg fresh without plastic? Chrissie

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    1. You might be able to see that inside my plastic bags the veggies are also draped with kitchen paper. This pulls the excess moisture off the fruit or veggies and feeds it back if they start to dry out. Maybe this would work, although not for as long, if instead of plastic you used greaseproof paper. It's worth a try 😊

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    2. Thank you, this new venture has been an eye opener, 'til now, I just pick up what I want from the supermarket but when I am on this mission I see that so much is in plastic ! As we make a lot of soup, I have treated myself to a mini chopper, it's so easy but the packaging was ridiculous. One good thing, a Green Grocer near to us has reverted to brown paper bags.

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    3. I reuse jam jars to store smaller quantities of fruit and veg, leftovers from opened tins etc. Freeze stuff like coconut milk or stewed apple in jam jars too.

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    4. That's a good idea too Faith, for smaller amounts of leftovers. Glass is so much nicer than plastic. I've never really frozen things in jars, I should give it a go :-)

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    5. I freeze in glass too. I don't like the fact that plastics leach into food, albeit in very small amounts. Just remember to loosen the lids when you take them out of the freezer, because the glass can crack as the liquid expands

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  4. Ohhh, free books. Awesome.

    God bless.

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  5. I puzzled for years about the onion shortage during WWII then found that we didn't grow many in this country they were mostly imported from France and because those grown here were grown from seed rather than sets so many people didn't bother.
    Then of course they needed all the fields for carrots and potatoes. Can't imagine cooking without onions now, everything would be like hospital food - tasteless!

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  6. Oh My Gosh...I didn't know you were back until I just saw you on John's blog. I am so glad...I really missed you and your blog. Welcome Back!

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    1. Haha .... I was only away for about 6 weeks. I blogged all through last year over on Our New Life in the Country 😊

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    2. Well, Sue, it was a looong 6 weeks to us!! I was also so happy that you started to blog again.

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