Saturday, 3 February 2018

Adding To The Piles


As I travel around the blogs on my sidebar and blogland in general I keep coming across books being pictured or mentioned ... especially wartime rationing books and home books ... that I think 'I'm sure I've got that' and sure enough usually a trawl around my bookshelves in either the living room, kitchen, spare room or my bedside tables reveals that, yes, I have indeed got that.


I've tried to get like with like on pretty much all of the bookcases and shelves but things in our shared interests overlap and books get moved around, so I'm still finding books that are pretty relevant for this years money saving marathon.



A case in point on spotting books on other peoples blogs was THIS post on Simple Living blog last month, when I spotted another couple of my books that I hadn't added to the kitchen shelves.


I found a few more related books upstairs while I was looking for 'The Grass Widow ... ' and 'The Austerity Book' and put them altogether ... then I couldn't resist adding something else to the top of the pile  ;-)

Sue xx

29 comments:

  1. This has some interesting info on and ideas http://maintenance.wartimehousewife.com/
    Arilx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't read her blog ... but I do have the book :-)

      Delete
  2. Lovely collection, I have some of those too. I have another suggestion for you if you don't already have it " Hebridean Cookbook" by Lillian Beckwith, she wrote some lovely books about her time in the Hebrides years ago and this cookbook covers the fact that often (if the weather was bad) they were cut of and had to make do. The cinnamon cookie recipe is really good! Printed by The Archor press in the seventies ISBN 0 09 917260 7

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oooh ... what a blast from the past. I used to have many of her books years ago, but I don't think I ever had the cookbook. I'll keep my eyes peeled in the boxes at car boot sales over the Summer and in the charity shop.

      Delete
  3. Can't see the Megan Westley one I mentioned in comments yesterday. AND I'm VERY cross that you have a picture of a tin of spam on your blog as I was just about to write a post about it because Col, whose tastebuds are all peculiar at the moment suddenly said he quite fancied some Spam!
    Foiled again! :-)
    I shall search my shelves for others books you haven't got........there must be one or two!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep ... I have it. I had a search earlier today and found it next to Jamie Oliver :-)

      It would seem we are very much on the same wavelength at the moment. Alan's been fancying Spam fritters for a while but I'm going to make him wait until rationing begins !!

      Delete
    2. I was asked to get a tin of Spam in and almost keeled over when I saw the price. I dropped it like a hot potato but weakened and bought it anyway. he can make his own Spam fritters though.

      Delete
    3. Have searched through my WWII collection and will post a photo "Books That Sue in Wales Might Not Have!"
      You do have many more thrifty books than I've got. I asked the library to get Rhonda Down To Earth books but they wouldn't- bother. They are too expensive for me. I had the Lilian Beckwith Hebridian Cookery book for a while but not now

      Delete
    4. There must be something in the air as I just opened a can of spam as something easy to have with an egg. I've got a terrible cold at the moment and haven't had an actual "meal" in days and for some reason the thought of some salty spam just seemed right!

      Delete
    5. Where did you find Spam in Toronto, Margie? From a fellow Torontonian.

      Delete
  4. You have a lovely collection Sue, I shall be putting a few more of those in my amazon wish list, I bought some more last week with some money I earn't through on line surveys, I will post about them when they arrive. I am going to try a few war recipes next week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't realise how many I had on a wartime theme until I started gathering them all together.

      Delete
  5. A lovely collection of fascinating books. I bet they're fun to read and re-read.
    J x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, yes they do get read and re-read frequently.

      Wartime recipes are my current bedtime reading, Alan is getting used to me suddenly exclaiming things like ... 'Ooh Mock Banana ... do you fancy trying that?'

      Delete
  6. I really have no books on war time cooking or rationing. I don't really know how things went here in Canada. Since both my parents lived on farms they once told me they didn't feel the rationing as badly as those who lived in the city. I think I may have to do some research on this topic very soon.

    God bless.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lovely books don't rate the Spam though. My mum used to dish it up once a week after the war years floured and fried. We were not fans. Same as when she served up Tripe & Onions a favourite from her childhood apparently. The onion sauce was lovely my Dad brother and I downed tools and would not after the initial taste eat it. Thing it was the only meal we never ate en-masse. Mum never served it again. But Spam is definitely off the menu here even OH not keen. My stepson thinks it is wonderful though. We went to a War Re=enactment event in Holme near us last year (no doubt we will be going again this year) but he went straight for the Spam!

    Pattypan

    x

    ReplyDelete
  8. Another title to look for which doesn't seem to be in the stack just yet - Sucking Eggs

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great collection of books. I've been reading the 1940's experiment blog some great recipes and information. My hubby asks for Spam occasionally, I'll probably buy it now they make a lite version. Strange how some of the cheaper foods are now quite expensive!

    ReplyDelete
  10. My mum also used to fry spam and serve it with mash. I seem to remember being happy to eat it as a small child.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Speaking of your upcoming more frugal living..I live in the US and don't know a lot of bloggers I could ask. Has anyone been in touch with Jane (Frugal Queen) to know if she will be restarting her blog? I'm always disappointed when someone I have followed for so long leaves. Why I am SO glad you came back, Sue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jane is fine, although she has had pleurisy recently. Although I don't think she will be restarting her blog anytime soon. But she is alive and well and still enjoying her frugal, but much more private lifestyle.

      Delete
    2. Thank you, Sue. I'm sad to hear about the blog but glad that she is doing well....other than the pleurisy.

      Delete
  12. I'm not sure why, but I have always loved old cookbooks. When life is too much with me, I look back at recipes in the White House cookbook that belonged to my grandmother, especially the ones that start with "kill and pluck a fat hen." My life may be difficult, but I don't have to harvest my food (unless I want to), or fire up the wood-burning stove and try to figure out how hot it is before I put in my carefully prepared bread dough and hope it comes out edible. Old cookbooks seem to me like a direct link to women before me, who struggled with the same limitations we do now to put dinner on the table--cost, time, available ingredients, our family's quirks--I find them comforting.
    As for cookbooks, do look for a copy of The Pauper's Cookbook, by Jocasta Innes, which I had the good fortune to find in a used bookstore long ago, and have treasured ever since. Her onion, bacon and potato hotpot has saved me many times when I couldn't figure out what we could have for dinner.
    I would also say that the food fetishists who say "oh no, you can't pollute your body with Spam" (or whatever) might find a more useful outlet for their energies than lecturing normal humans. I never liked Spam, but my brother ate many fried bologna sandwiches in his youth and is still going strong. So now it's bedtime and I need to find just the right cookbook to soothe me to slee[

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used to have a copy of Jocasta's book, it was always kept with my Shirley Goode books, so I'm wondering if I've sold it. I'll have to have a look through the shelves again.

      I guess Spam is no worse than all the other processed meats we have these days .... Alan will let me know ;-)

      Delete
  13. Books which are so much more than simply cook books, wonderful! I don't eat meat these days, but I must admit that I have very happy memories of Spam fritters, crunchy and golden on the outside, deliciously squidgy and tasty within. Spam sandwiches with HP sauce were a favourite, too.

    ReplyDelete
  14. You can't get any more frugal than Elizabeth West's Kitchen in the Hills. My goodness, there's one lady who could make 6d do the work of half a crown, not just a shilling! Not strictly war-time by name but given her age, they were invented or reinvented from necessity, just as the wartime recipes were.

    Her books were part of the inspiration for us moving to Wales. I believe she and Alan ended up in the Forest of Dean.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have always loved her books and have re-read Hovel in the Hills so many times over the last 20 odd years. It was a very happy coincidence that we ended up living only a couple of miles from where they used to live and now shop in the same town she shopped in.

      Delete
  15. I’ve had to blow up your pictures, to see the titles. That way I can look in the library for them. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are now closed.

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.