Saturday, 10 February 2018

Getting Ready


Every spare moment this week has seen me pouring over books, raiding the kitchen cupboard for things I already have, and gathering them together on the worktops ready for a group shot.

Luckily food is a still life and you can add to the group as and when you find something ... and no one wanders off or stops smiling for the camera  :-)


I've been weighing out the food we have ... we're allowed 1lb of dried fruit for 8 of our points. 

Altogether we are allowed 16 points each per month, so a total of 32 points to spend and I need to make sure I spend them wisely.  There's not much fresh fruit around at this time of year so a decent amount of dried fruit seemed very important. and as we are keeping to it being February but in 1940 there wouldn't have been much fruit available.  I actually have some rhubarb coming up that I am about to move over onto the Veggie Patch, there are two sticks one of them slightly bigger than the other ... and I have a feeling that the larger one might accidently snap off when we move the plant  ;-)

  Of course while I am doing this Living on Rations Challenge I also have to keep an eye on our budget as this really is a Challenge within a Challenge and The Purse still only has it's limited funds available.  So I'll be using some of the vouchers that I posted about yesterday to shop for anything I don't have ready for next week.  But mostly I think we will be okay with our food supplies from the cupboards and the freezer, and of course straight from the Veggie Patch.



There was a big pack of ham in the fridge and although Alan would no doubt have volunteered to chomp his way through it all before rationing starts I decided to weigh it into little 2oz packs and pop them in the freezer ... I did leave him enough to nibble on when he got back from his business meetings this week, so he's happy.


I'm not sure if you were allowed to split the listed 4oz of bacon or ham per week, but I think I'm going to if Alan wants 2oz of bacon and 2oz of ham.  It does give a lot more options over the course of the week.


I'm more than happy with my sweetie ration, I usually take one or two candy canes to the cinema with me, so I doubt I'll get through this many in a week ... well my teeth won't be happy if I do!

We each get 3oz of sweets per week and rather neatly although mine weighed under at two and three quarter ounces ...


... Alan's weighed over at three and a quarter.


Which of course gives a grand total of the required six ounces.

Alan's choice of sweets for the cinema are little Fudges from the Christmas stash in the cupboard :-)

Well today I'm going to be sorting out the meat ration ready for Alan next week and then seeing what fresh vegetables  I need to buy with my Tesco voucher.

Sue xx


24 comments:

  1. I'm really looking forward to reading about how you get on, Sue, and seeing how it works both from a health and frugal point of view. Well, obviously it's going to be frugal on those amounts! It's the health aspect that I'm more interested in though....it seems a bit carb heavy. I'm diabetic so have to watch the carbs as they raise my blood glucose levels. And obviously I wouldn't be having the sweets (I've never been a sweet eater anyway, even before I was diabetic). Husband and I definitely need to lose weight and I think a big part of that is cutting down our portion sizes - even being aware of the amounts we usually have would be a good start. Good luck Sue, I shall be reading with interest.

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    1. I agree the rations do seem carb heavy and I guess during the war years people lived a much more physical lifestyle and so would burn those carbs off. Alan is a diabetic too so he will be carefully monitoring his blood sugar.

      We are going to do a range of tests ... our weight, body fat readings, measurements, blood pressure and blood sugar readings ... before we start and then again at the end to see how the reading compare. It should be interesting.

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    2. Good idea to do all those readings.

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  2. Sounds like a very challenging year, both physically and mentally. I wish you luck.

    I thought Alan had retired last year.

    Joan (Devon)

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    1. His version of retirement did not match up with what I was expecting at all !! He still works 'part-time' from home anything from 20 - 40 hours per week for the 'day job' and has to travel regularly for meetings. Oh well, it's all helping to get rid of this last bit of the mortgage.

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  3. Good luck with the Challenge, Sooze mentioned about "carb heavy" but looking back at wartimes there weren't many obese people, they worked hard and with the rations burn't it off. I am cutting down portion sizes as I need to shift a few pounds but don't want to be eating big meals all the time anyway. Tonight I am making the tomato macaroni au gratin wartime recipe, it sounds good, I will post about it later.
    Have a good weekend.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. People in general were healthier than ever by the end of the war, and like you say there were hardly any obese people.

      Your meal sounds delicious, I'll be over for a look at the recipe ... I have one tin of tomatoes bought with our monthly points ... I want to use it wisely :-)

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  4. I don't think it was a particularly HEALTHY diet...children's teeth were in awful shape after the war. And that fake butter was garbage!

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    1. The children with Mums that managed the rations wisely were generally a much healthier lot. But I guess in poorer houses a lot of bread and jam, and even as my ex-husband remembered 'sugar butties' were consumed. That and the lack of toothpaste would have made for much poorer tooth health unfortunately.

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    2. Yes, my husband had sugar sarnies too, but then being one of ten children, I guess his parents had to feed them all with whatever they had.

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    3. Meant to say....he was born in 1951 but says some rationing was still in force, from what his mother told him.

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    4. I think rationing was in until 1953. I was born in 1947 and remember quite vividly taking the ration book to the little shop at the end of our street.

      Joan (Devon)

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    5. My ex-husband was born in 1955, just after rationing ended, in a very poor part of Salford, Greater Manchester. His upbringing was very like 'Angela's Ashes'. Living on extremely poor quality or hardly any food, bedbugs, and moonlight flits when his Mum couldn't afford to pay the rent collector.

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    6. We had/have fluoride in our water these days and our overall diet is better with regard to nutrients, calcium etc, unlike the 40's

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  5. Did you get some more visitors, I sent some over from MSE forum.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. There has been a bit of new activity ... thanks Ilona :-)

      There seems to be a lot of folk very interested in this at the moment.

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  6. As one of your interested folk (mentioned in your response to Ilona), I think this is just such a fascinating challenge that I can't wait to see how it goes. I like a challenge but this is a step too far for me so I am going to be enjoying yours!

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    1. It's really holding my interest too. I love all the things that I'm learning. The Home Front was a challenge to so many left at home while relatives and friends went off to fight. We have to try and do it justice if we do it at all.

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  7. According to Back in Time for Tea, Britain was it's healthiest during those years. I suppose it's how you measure healthy. Type 2 diabetes is linked with being overweight something that almost one third of the population in the UK is these days. My husband is type 1 and I have read 2 studies regarding Type 2 because my daughter has Type 2 but weighs 9 stone. They have found that losing weight and controlling your diet has resulted in not having to take the medication for Type 2. The extra food we can enjoy and sedentary lifestyle bring its problems!

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    1. Definitely, most of us could do with eating less and doing a lot more ... me included 😊

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  8. Looking forward to your adventures using ration amounts.

    God bless.

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  9. I'm sorry, but I don't see the point of all this. We're not on rationing now (and believe me I remember the hell it was). Why all the frugality, when it's not necessary nowadays? My DH and I get pension and disability payments, but we can still afford pork and lamb chops, belly of pork, oxtail , steak etc. We make bulk freezer amounts of chilli and bolognaise, and we make our homemade soups with leftovers, but we never have to resort to your sort of 'diet'. Why is this? Sorry, not trying to be difficult, but I simply don't understand how you can't manage to afford a normal eating plan. Please don't take offence, I seriously don't understand By the way my DH and I are in our mid 70s and perfectly healthy.

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    1. If you read the blog from the beginning you would find out that Sue and her husband have a small mortgage to pay off so are living frugally in order to do this.

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    2. It's all been written about before on the blog. But basically, as Fiona has kindly pointed out, it is so that this year we spend as little as possible, so that we can throw all our available money at the remains of our mortgage.

      I'm glad to hear that your and your husband are both in perfect health, but that is not the case for everyone. We both have health issues, but they can be helped enormously by a simple and careful re-jig of our diets ... and that is what we are doing while we do this challenge.

      If you don't understand or like this challenge please don't feel you have to read about what we are up to each day. I understand it is not everyone's cup of tea.

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