Friday, 23 February 2018

Living on Rations - Week Two - Day 11 - Catching Up


I totally forgot to post about this weeks shopping, so here we are on a catch up.  At the start of the week I spent my £5 Tesco coupon and £2.60 cash on the shopping in the photo.  I decided to buy us a banana each, even though they would not have been available during the war ... I don't want to risk scurvy for the sake of a challenge  ;-)

There was nothing else we needed, so nothing else was bought.  Alan requested some more salted peanuts to  have with his beer while the rugby is on, so I relented and let him have his little treat and I've been seeing and reading so many people on wartime rations having tomatoes that I think the urge to get some was great ... so that was my 'treat'. 

Tomatoes a 'treat' ... gosh I have got into character!!


The receipt.


Left in The Purse £303.41


Someone mentioned that my homemade bread always look pretty perfect ... it doesn't if you forget all about it and leave it in the oven for almost three hours!!

The chickens benefited ... but Ethel turned her nose up at it.

Yesterdays food was simple.  Toast for breakfast before I set off into England and lunch with my Mum and son - British Restaurants are brilliant  ;-)

Alan stayed at home working and had some soup and toast for lunch.


Our evening meal was the rest of the Woolton Pie, this time reheated with it's mashed potato top and served with sausages, two for Alan, one for me.  I have to say I think I prefer it with a pastry top ... mashed potatoes on top of a very potato-ey base makes it quite bland whereas the wholewheat flour and suet pastry top gave it much more flavour.

The draw for the giveaway book is being done this morning :-)

Sue xx

15 comments:

  1. It's funny about tomatoes being a treat, that's how I feel about them in the winter. I rarely purchase them from the store, in the winter they are expensive and not too flavorful, and in the summer we have tons of them from the garden. I just remembered I froze some cherry tomatoes, I'll have to find them in the deep freeze and see how they do on a pizza. Deb in Ohio

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    1. The first one, sliced really thinly and dried slightly on kitchen paper before being put on a sandwich was absolute heaven. Although you are right there's not a lot of flavour in them compared to homegrown ones.

      Lucky you still having some of your own in the freezer. I usually put them into the oven for half an hour to intensify the flavour and dry them a bit when I'm using frozen tomatoes on something like a pizza, but however you use them they will be lovely. A little taste of Summer in the middle of Winter.

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    2. "A little taste of Summer in the middle of Winter"....that should be in a poem somewhere! Deb

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  2. What a shame about the bread. Could you have made breadcrumbs with them or were they too hard?

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    1. They were bricks ... my knife was bending cutting up the slices for the chickens!!

      I guess I could have used just the central section for breadcrumbs or maybe croutons but it was hardly worth the effort after a long day in the kitchen.

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  3. Replies
    1. Haha ... you are easily pleased ;-)

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  4. Are you sure you only want to ration for a month? I'm enjoying and learning much from these daily check-ins I just thought how I will miss them :) I am sure there will be more adventures after the rations though!

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    1. I think we will be adapting our food habits somewhat to stay in line with our current rationing, as we are feeling so much better on this style of eating. But after this month of food rations and being in the kitchen so much it will be time to start on growing our own foods again ... so we will still be 'Digging for Victory' just in the more literal sense of the word. :-)

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  5. And also I am glad to hear of Ethel now and again. Glad she stayed with you.

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    1. Oh she's very much with us after her two months with Will's main flock and the Tup. Unfortunately she didn't like him, and as an elderly lady of a sheep she knew how to stay out of his way, so we doubt there's any little patter of tiny feet to look forward to.

      She's currently living with her new friends, the chickens, and is absolutely fascinated by them. Especially their habit of disappearing into the henhouse at night. She sleeps next to it and is waiting to greet them in the morning when they all troop back down the ramp.

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  6. Well into my 40's, summer into fall I loved to eat a tomato like an apple but standing in front of the kitchen sink or with a towel to catch the drips. These days my stomach rebels at just a tomato :-( Your poor bread. I am going to have a try at making Irish soda bread on Sat.

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    1. I used to eat them like that, messy but delicious, but now it's either cut into wedges on a salad or sliced thinly in a sandwich. Unless of course it's a homegrown cherry tomato straight off the plant while I'm busy in the polytunnel. So much of our homegrown salad crop gets eaten outdoors while we are working.

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  7. For many years I didn't buy tomatoes at all, we had our own for a lot of months and out of season bought ones were hard or tasteless or both,but I've been buying the tubs of little plum toms this winter and they actually taste like tomatoes and there are lots in a pack for £1

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  8. Even your overcooked bread looks better than my last effort! I intend to have another go next month but using your recipe Sue.

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