Thursday, 8 February 2018

Oops ... Forgotten Spending


These came through the post yesterday, I had totally forgotten ordering them the other week and when the courier handed them over I said I wonder what this is ...


... he said  'I think they're spuds love'.

Yes they are  ... 10 Majestic Main Crop seed potatoes.

I really wanted to buy these as these are the type of potatoes that were grown all over the UK during the war years.  They are a good cropper, with high yields of very versatile potatoes ... or so I've been told. 

I searched locally for them but then, thanks to a reader I found out they are a Scottish potato, so I went online and just about managed to get them.  They had sold out pretty much everywhere I tried, they must be a really popular type, but then one last supplier had a few bags of ten left, so I snapped some up quickly.


And then that reminded me I had not written my spend on the other seed potatoes down in my 'non-food' column at the back of my diary.

So this has now been rectified. 

A total spend of £12.96 on forty potatoes ... it will be very interesting to see what I get for my money by the end of the growing season.

Sue xx 

13 comments:

  1. It's exciting, starting to get in what's needed for the new year's vegetables, isn't it?
    J x

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    Replies
    1. It's keeping me from going mad ... the urge to plant is great ;-)

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  2. Do you stagger the planting a bit so they don't all come at once?
    Will you grow in bags/pots or in the ground?
    I shall be trying some in bags and pots this year.

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    Replies
    1. You can't really stagger planting potatoes as they need to go in when they have sprouted, and usually by March. It is possible to plant them under conditions to speed or slow growth though. So I shall put a couple of pots in the polytunnel and the rest in the net tunnel. This doesn't vary it that much though.

      What I do is bring in a plant worth of potatoes at a time and leave the rest growing on. So you start with 'baby new potatoes', then 'new potatoes', and then they get bigger. Then you move on to the second earlies and do the same again, finishing with the main crop, which you leave as late as possible and store in a cool dark place when you eventually have to harvest them all.

      I am growing mainly in pots with one bed of outdoor potatoes. My outdoor beds need resting after too many 'volunteer' potatoes have grown out there in the last couple of years.

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  3. Do you add the cost of seeds and your potatoes purchased above to a separate list, showing the cost of growing your food, or does it all get added to your food list.

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    Replies
    1. I am not including them in the 'food purchasing' i.e. the money in the purse, but I'm keeping tabs on anything I buy that isn't food from a shop. The money for all the crops and seeds comes from our business account. As long as I know what I've spent I'm happy.

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  4. How deep a pot do you need for growing potatoes? We have always just planted them in the ground.

    God bless.

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  5. The smallest pots I use are at least twice as wide as a bucket and a bit taller, if that makes sense, but I'll use anything that is bigger as well. When I run out of pots I use old compost bags, roll them down to about a foot high, put a layer of soil or compost in then couple of seed potatoes and then a good layer of compost and roll up as you need to fill with more compost or soil, don't forget to make drainage holes if there aren't already some there.

    In pots I start two or three seed potatoes off about six inches from the bottom and then earth up as the plants grow, that way you get more and more potatoes growing up the stem of the plant.

    Yes they grow fine in the ground but you always get some damaged when you dig them up, or slugs and pests get at them, you can avoid this almost completely growing in pots and bags as you can protect them better and simply tip up when you want to harvest some potatoes for a meal or two.

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  6. My 11 year old son has been studying the Second World War and has asked if we could live on World war 2 rations for a month!!! I've said I'll give it go but I'm not sure he'll last the month. Your blog is an inspiration, :)

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    Replies
    1. It will be a real eye opener for him ... but very educational. He'll will have to choose wisely with his 12oz monthly sweet ration 😉

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  7. Watching the program Back In Time For Tea the other evening it was quite shocking what people had to live on during the 1920's and 1930's. Next week is the 1940's(onwards) and there does seem to be more processed foods around like canned meats, canned veg, breakfast cereals and biscuits etc.

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    Replies
    1. I really enjoyed the programme and I'm looking forward to next weeks, it's coming just at the right time for us.

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